What Is Measured

What Is Measured

Reading Comprehension questions measure your ability to understand, analyze, and apply information and concepts presented in written form.

This section evaluates the following abilities:
Understanding words and statements in reading passages:
Questions of this type test your understanding of and ability to comprehend terms used in the passage and your understanding of the English language.
Understanding the logical relationships between significant points and concepts in the reading passages:
Questions of this type ask you to determine the strong and weak points of an argument or to evaluate the importance of arguments and ideas in a passage.
Drawing inferences from facts and statements in the reading passages:
Questions of this type ask you to consider factual statements or information and, on the basis of that information, reach a general conclusion.
Understanding and following the development of quantitative concepts as they are presented in verbal material:
Questions of this type involve the interpretation of numerical data or the use of simple arithmetic to reach conclusions about material in a passage.
Critical Reasoning Questions
Critical Reasoning questions are designed to test the reasoning skills involved in making arguments, evaluating arguments, and formulating or evaluating a plan of action. Questions are based on materials from a variety of sources. No familiarity with the specific subject matter is needed.
What Is Measured
This section measures your ability to reason effectively in three areas:
Argument construction:
Questions of this type may ask you to recognize the basic structure of an argument, properly drawn conclusions, underlying assumptions, well-supported explanatory hypotheses, or parallels between structurally similar arguments.
Argument evaluation:
Questions of this type may ask you to analyze a given argument, recognize factors that would strengthen or weaken an argument, reasoning errors committed in making an argument, or aspects of the methods by which an argument proceeds.
Formulating and evaluating a plan of action:
Questions of this type may ask you to recognize the relative appropriateness, effectiveness, or efficiency of different plans of action; factors that would strengthen or weaken a proposed plan of action; or assumptions underlying a proposed plan of action.
Sentence Correction Questions
Sentence Correction questions ask you which of the five choices best expresses an idea or relationship. The questions will require you to be familiar with the stylistic conventions and grammatical rules of standard written English. You must also demonstrate your ability to improve incorrect or ineffective expressions.
What Is Measured
This section tests two broad aspects of language proficiency:
Correct expression:
A correct sentence is grammatically and structurally sound. It conforms to all the rules of standard written English, e.g., noun-verb agreement, pronoun consistency, pronoun case, and verb tense sequence. A correct sentence will not have dangling, misplaced, or improperly formed modifiers, unidiomatic or inconsistent expressions, or faults in parallel construction.
Effective expression:
An effective sentence expresses an idea or relationship clearly and concisely, as well as grammatically. This does not mean that the choice with the fewest and simplest words is necessarily the best answer. It means that there are no superfluous words or needlessly complicated expressions in the best choice. In addition, an effective sentence uses proper diction of a sentence, you must be able to recognize whether the words are well chosen, accurate, and suitable for the context.
What is the best way to study for the GMAT?
Preparing to take the GMAT can be a daunting task. Those who succeed on the GMAT know the test, have a true picture of their strengths and weaknesses, and prepare accordingly. Below are some helpful tips and advice gleaned from people who have seen it all.
Know the test:
The test is less about your pre-existing knowledge and more about managing and understanding the test. Successful student tips include using a highly recommended test-prep guide, reading about and taking practice tests and possibly taking a prep course.
Give yourself time:
For most people, one month of test preparation is not enough. take practice exams until they are consistently testing in the range for admission. Select a test date at least one semester before the application deadline. This will give you time to know whether you need to improve on your score and reschedule the test. Keep in mind that most prospective students score 50-100 points higher on practice tests than they do on the actual test.
Know yourself:
Will you get discouraged if the test material seems too difficult? If so, start out by studying your areas of strength. Do you get energized by solving complicated problems? Consider facing the most grueling problems first. Don’t try to cram new types of problems in the days leading up to the exam. Instead, hammer down your approach to the problems you already know how to solve.
Practice, practice, practice:
Learn how to space your time correctly. Try to practice the entire test at the same time of day as your scheduled test. Be sure to brush up on mathematical formulas and abbreviations used in algebra and geometry. Try taking a practice test in a place like a coffee shop or library with people around. In most testing centers, people are sitting side by side at computer terminals. Sometimes those people will be taking an entirely different test with different time limits. Work on focusing in spite of the activity around you. Have some preparation before the exam, this will help in maintaining an even keel throughout the test.
Stay positive:
Embrace test day with a good attitude. Remember to get a good night’s rest beforehand and eat a healthy breakfast. Knowing that you did your best in preparing will allow you to reach your full potential on the test.

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